Ralph Lauren: Be Brave – Stand your ground

After that I wanted to sell to Bloomingdale’s, which was the kingpin in New York. When I finally had the chance to show the buyer the ties, he said, “Ralph, I like the patterns—but you gotta make them a quarter of an inch narrower. And I want you to take your name off and put on Sutton East”—that was their private label. I said to the guy, “Gary, I’m dying to sell to Bloomingdale’s, but I’m closing my bag because I can’t take my name off. And I can’t make the tie a quarter of an inch narrower.”

Ralph: Isn’t that interesting? Later that day after I left Bloomingdale’s, I told some colleagues what had happened. They said, “Ralph, who cares if you have to change your tie?” I said, “No, no—I’m not going to do it,” and I continued to sell to other stores. Six months later, Bloomingdale’s called me again. “Listen,” the buyer said, “we’re gonna put in a whole rack and case of your ties!”

Bill Gates: Advice for today’s kids

Well, I’d encourage kids to learn science, to find a way to enjoy it, and experiment. Just the model of the world you get the depth of your understanding, and the opportunities that you’ll have will be fantastic. We need society to be more literate about science and innovation. We need to challenge people and take their innate curiosity, not let it face away. Even innovation in education, using these tools to let you see the best lecturers or learn about an experiment that you might want to try. So if you’re young today, you’re actually exposed to more things and I envy kids growing up now. They’ll have a chance to solve big problems and they have better learning tools than certainly my generation had.

Coca Cola: Empower local talent to sell the product

Coke’s been in Africa since 1928, but most of the time they couldn’t reach the distant markets, because they had a system that was a lot like in the developed world, which was a large truck rolling down the street. And in Africa, the remote places, it’s hard to find a good road. But Coke noticed something — they noticed that local people were taking the product, buying it in bulk and then reselling it in these hard-to-reach places. And so they took a bit of time to learn about that. And they decided in 1990 that they wanted to start training the local entrepreneurs, giving them small loans. They set them up as what they called micro-distribution centers, and those local entrepreneurs then hire sales people, who go out with bicycles and pushcarts and wheelbarrows to sell the product. There are now some 3,000 of these centers employing about 15,000 people in Africa. In Tanzania and Uganda, they represent 90 percent of Coke’s sales.

Bill Gates: 20,000 hours of Teacher’s videos

Bill & Melinda Gates foundation invested in studying the very very good teachers. We have been working with 3,000 teachers in districts across the country on a project called measures of effective teaching.

We took 20,000 hours of video and looked at various measures; what were they doing differently. We’ve created a lot of model districts. We had observers, their peers,evaluators, watch videos of teachers in the classroom and write how they did, observing, giving feedback.

For example, did they ask their students challenging questions: Did they find multiple ways to explain an idea. We also had students fill out surveys with questions like, does your teacher know when the class understands a lesson? Do you learn to correct your mistakes?

The results were very good. What we found is very exciting. First the teachers who did well on these observations had far better student outcomes. So it tells us we’re asking the right questions. Second, teachers in the program told us that these videos and these surveys from the students were very helpful diagnostic tools, because they pointed to specific places where they can improve.

If we could get it adopted currently and scale it up it would start to move the the dropout rate and the math and reading achievements.  

Facebook: It’s not about money, it’s about people

Mark Zuckerberg is among the youngest billionaires in the world. He is only 28 years old and his net worth is $52.1 billion.

His wedding with Priscilla Chan was held in his backyard. And the couple were seen eating at McDonalds while they were on their honeymoon in Italy.

Zuckerberg reportedly drives an Acura “because it’s safe and not ostentatious.” If you notice one thing about this young billionaire it is that he wears the same style of outfit everyday. He wears the same gray t-shirt, jeans, and hoodie.

GQ has named him “Worst Dressed Man of Silicon Valley”

His entire wardrobe probably costs less than $700, and it probably costs less than $200 a year to keep his wardrobe updated. Considering that the average American family spends around $1,700 a year on clothing, Zuckerberg definitely has the right idea on saving money.