Stories to Build Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Patty Shrem There was a girl who was the director and the head of the play. But, she didn’t know how to act so well. So, she gave acting part to someone else, who wasn’t poplar. The unpopular girl was really good. After the play was over the popular girl told the unpopular girl, “You were really good. You should be in a lot of other plays.” The girl felt good and comfortable with herself even since.

This story was published in the Bar Mitzvah Magazine

Stories to Build Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Sharon Roubin If you are part of a dance and you are in the back, but your friend is in the front, you’ll most likely try to move up. But, then, everyone will get confused with their spots and the dance becomes a mess. So, now you don’t get the spotlight and neither does your friend. If you and your friend are trying to make a fruit basket for sick children, the designer gets the credit. But, she couldn’t have made it without someone buying those ripe, fresh looking fruits and someone picking that right basket to match the fruits. Maybe the designer knows how to do these things, but, thanks for all those people involved, they made the idea happen.

This story was published in the Bar Mitzvah Magazine

Jewish Stories to Build Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Raizy Makaron When we had a school play one girl wanted to be in charge of testing everybody for singing but she didn’t know how to sing so she didn’t know who was good or bad.  But when we had a color war everybody participated and was good at what they were chosen to be. The color war came out very nice because everyone they used their skills.

Jewish Stories to Build Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Leah Hatanian “Girls, listen up! We are going to make a play, ‘The Wizard of Us.’ I am going to split you up to practice with your group lines from the play. On Monday, will be the auditions. Good luck! So the groups are: Sarah, Miri and Chana in the 1st group.” The second Sarah heard her group she grabbed Miri and Chana and said, “I’m Dorothy! I am clearly made for the part.” “Woah-oh-oh, oh no!” Miri cried. “Sarah, the last time we had a play you were the one who got the main part by nagging the teacher. On the day of the play, you were so nervous that you stuttered through the whole beginning and then I had to take over.” Chana continued, ‘Yeah, Sarah, you should be the dog because your animal impersonations are excellent.” When Sarah heard those words, she ran out of the class and began to cry because she wanted to be in the spotlight. The day of the play: “Ruf, Ruf, Ruf,” Sarah barked dramatically. After Sarah stopped barking, she heard laughter from the audience. She realized that Hashem made you with ups and downs and sometimes you can’t be in the spotlight. But, if you work with what you’re good at and together as a team, you will succeed. And, in fact, the play was a success.

This story was published in the Bar Mitzvah Magazine

 

Jewish Stories to Build Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Amanda Heskiel In color war, Sarah was the general. We split up the team. We needed to make songs and then to sing as a team. Esther was chosen to write the songs. She thought that Rachel was much better in writing songs. Esther gave that job to Rachel. When Rachel finished writing it, she gave it to Sarah. Sarah photocopied it and gave it out to the whole team. We practiced the songs when we sang it against the blue team. Every one complimented Sarah on the great song. Sarah said, “Thank you.” and then she said, “But, Rachel was the one to write it. She should be the one being complimented, not me.” We learn from Sarah that, even though she was the main person, she didn’t want all the credit. She was nice enough to give the credit to the person who deserved it.

This story was published in the Bar Mitzvah Magazine

Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Esther Kishk “I want the lead role,” I shouted. “I really want to be the lead in our school play. I will be amazing in the spotlight.” “I think that Leah will be amazing in the spotlight,” Barbara stated. “No, I want to be the lead. I am a really good singer,” I moaned. “Even though Leah is a better singer, I still want to be in the spotlight.” “Come on, you always get to be the lead role,” Barbara told me. I guess she was right. “I’ll give Leah a shot.” “Leah, do you want the spotlight?” We asked her. “No, I am okay. I don’t like the spotlight,” she told us. “Should we convince her into doing it?” Barbara asked. “No. If she doesn’t want, we shouldn’t force her.” “I’ll just write the songs,” Leah said as she left. The night of the play, “We would like to give credit to Leah for writing the amazing songs of the play,” I shouted. I could see Leah. A small smile appeared on her face. She was happy and so was I.

This story was published in the Bar Mitzvah Magazine

Jewish Stories to Build Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Eddie Zeitoune If I was the coach, to make a basketball team, I would make everyone try everything to see who is good at what. I would tell them they are all good but I would make it fair, I would put someone who is good and not so good. It’s not nice to make anyone feel bad so I would pick even someone who is not so good at basketball. I don’t care if I would end up losing. I know I made someone feel good.

Jewish Stories to Build Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Sara Halwani One day a girl, named Gabrielle, came home from school and told her mom that she is the director of the school play. Her mom spoke to her about choosing the right actors to star in the play. Gabrielle thought about it before she had the talk with her mom and said to herself that she would pick her best friend shelly for the star of the show. But her mom said, “It wouldn’t be nice to do that because there are other girls that have hidden talents and would want to be the star of the play.” Gabrielle said, “Ok,” and went to school. She was planning to pick her best friend Shelly automatically for the part but she listened to her mother’s advice and had an audition for the play. One of the shyest girls in the school became the most popular girl because Gabrielle picked her for the lead role.

This story was published in the Bar Mitzvah Magazine

Jewish Stories to Build Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Charles Seruya One day my 3 friends and I were walking to a pizza shop. About half a mile away we came to a street that we didn’t recognize. We were lost for about half an hour. One of my friends said, “Hey, the pizza shop is that way.” We didn’t believe him but we were lost anyway, so how much worse would it get. We began walking in that direction and sure enough we got there in 20 minutes. Because of his hidden talent of sense of direction we got pizza and he led us home. It’s important to compliment hidden talent since then he will use this talent more often because he will think it is a special and important.

This story was published in the Bar Mitzvah Magazine

Jewish Stories to Build Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Pamela Franco We had a math project and we got jobs. I was the director and my partner was the presenter. I worked really hard and I did it very well. It was the day to present. I was sick so that I couldn’t come to school. My partner did not work on the project and she presented it. Everyone gave her credit. When I came to school the next day, everyone was asking me what was my project and I felt embarrassed because my partner didn’t say my name. That day she saw me sad and in front of the whole class she said that I also did the project and I felt much better.

Teamwork – CLICK TO COMMENT

By Mary Salem The teacher asked Rachel to organize the play and to give everyone a part in the play. Rachel had the chance to take the main part for herself. But, she knew she was not very good at singing. Also, she knew her best friend Sandy was very good at singing and acting. So, she decided to give the main part to her. Rachel was done giving the main parts and responsibility. The whole crew was working hard. But, Rachel saw one girl, Lisa, working very very hard. Lisa was the costume designer. She would work day and night making the costumes. On the day of the play, when Rachel made her speech, she told everyone about Lisa’s designs and how she worked so hard. Rachel saw the smile on Lisa’s face. She knew that Lisa would always work on her talent. Now, she knows that she has a gift talent from Hashem.

This story was published in the Bar Mitzvah Magazine